Long live the kids…

The kid
The kid

It was a mid-term result day of my three kids, a few months back. I went to their school to collect the result cards. I had a little conversation with the kids’ teachers about their performance and the results, and then I left the school. No sooner did I arrive home that I got a call from the school asking me to go back to the school as the Headmistress wanted to talk to me. I wondered what could possibly be the issue. I suspected my son Moazzan might have done something as I already had been called upon to hear a complaint against him. Anyways, I went and met the Headmistress. She said she had received complaint against Moazzan. “Here we go, as expected.”, I said to myself. She told me that Moazzan had brought a condom into the class (my eyes rolled); he gave it to his friend and told him that it was a balloon. The kid took it home and his parents found out what he was carrying. When asked where he got it from, he told them that his friend at school had given it to him. The parents came to the school and lodged the complaint. The headmistress then advised me to keep our personal belongings away from kids’ reach, and we should know what things the kids were bringing to school.

All the way during her talk I tried to control my laughter, but at the same time felt embarrassed when she said to keep personal things away from children. However, I apologized and told her how Moazzan really got his hands on ‘the’ balloon.

Here is how he got ‘em:

It so happened that we had returned from a visit to our village only a few days back. Our village is very small, say with a fewer than 70 homes and all the villagers are related to each other in one way or the other. Literacy rate is 50% for men and 5% for women, the primary business of men is agriculture, while all women are housewives. There are small shops which sell groceries for everyday use and confectionery items for kids. At such shops, the cheapest rubbers in town are sold to the kids as balloons. The people in the village are familiar with the purpose of the raincoats though, but they are least concerned about these being sold as balloons to the kids. My son also bought a few johnnys and brought them with him here to Karachi. I didn’t know that till the time I was told by the headmistress.

 And then I told my kid to never play with those balloons again.  :-)

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