Path to Peace

Kalyan Yaman-II

(Path to peace)

 

Thou art the friend; the healer thou;

For every pain the remedy–

Cure for my heart, thy voice alone

the only cure it is for me……

The reason why I call for thee

is none can cure my heart but thou.

 

Thou art the friend, the Healer thou

for every ailment balm dost send;

Merciful God–all drugs are vain;

the pains by drugs will never end;

Unless ordered by thee O friend,

no drug will ever sickness cure.

 

Thou art the friend, the Healer thou;

for sufferings thou the remedy;

Thou divest; curtest disease, dost guide,

master thou art eternally–

Yet, I am wonderstruck to see

that you physicians still provide.

 

Strike friend– thy hand raise, favour me–

hold not your hand, and should I die

By such death I shall honored be

which through this wound is caused.

 

Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai

Universal Culture

I came to see this picture in Japan which reminded me of the same culture or tradition or superstition or belief or whatever-you-call-it here in my country. And in neighboring countries, and in countries far & beyond. This just confirms one thing that howsoever we appear different in terms of race, color, caste, creed, language and appearance, but our core emotions such as love, hope, fear, happiness remain the same. In different parts of the world people may have different ways to feel and show such emotions, still some ways remain universal.

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This is a photo I took in Sapporo, Japan of Ema, the prayers and wishes penned and hung in the grounds of Shinto shrines. From heartfelt hopes about exam results, or being noticed by that oblivious boy in your class, to wishes for a prosperous or healthy future, you can think of them as prayers and hopes  made manifest and left in public.

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This photo I took at the Shrine of Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai, in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Bhittai was a sufi saint, poet and a musician who lived around 18th Century. People visit the shrine, make a wish and tie the knots (of threads, a piece of cloth etc) to a tree inside the shrine. And when their wishes come true, they come to visit the Shrine again to pay homage to the Saint.

My favourite couplet of Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai

Thou art the friend, the Healer thou;
for sufferings thou the remedy;
Thou divest; curtest disease, dost guide,
master thou art eternally–
Yet, I am wonderstruck to see
that you physicians still provide

Weekly Photo Challenge: Future Tense

 

The Valima and the Trip

What can be more delighting than travelling with a group of friends over a hundred miles to attend a friend’s wedding reception? On November 19, 2011 at 3pm we set off from Karachi to Mirpur Khas to attend Rehan’s wedding valima. I was desperately looking forward to this event as quite lately I badly wanted a time out. Earlier we were to leave at 12 in the noon, then because of Afaque the plan was changed to 3pm, which meant losing 3 hours of extra fun. However, while everyone was ready to roll, Tiku went to fetch his suit from the dry cleaner and after lots of curses and gaaliyan he made himself ready in 30 minutes. With a group of friends no matter where we go, no matter what happens, FUN is guaranteed. It happened to be a wonderful road trip and a visit to the shrine of Sufi Saint Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai. The best part was the short stay at Dhabas for a strong cup of dhoodpati chai.